Monthly Archive: May 2012

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20 Reasons Appraisers Should Get Paid Full Fee

JIM THORPE, Pa., May 24, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — Rick Grant of RGA Public Relations and Jeff Schurman of Leading Causes have released an industry white paper entitled “The Appraisal Management Company Full-Fee Hypothesis.” This is the first paper in a series the two plan to write in 2012, while also working with a number of mortgage technology thought leaders to produce other papers. “I’m very proud of the work we’ve done on this paper,” said Grant. “While the conclusions we have reached are bound to stir up controversy, this is an issue the industry needs to start taking very seriously....

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June 30th Is Fast Approaching

Have you taken your 2012-2013 National USPAP Update yet? Section 1455.160: (Paraphrased) A real estate appraiser must complete the 7-hour National USPAP Update Course or its equivalent within 6 months after the effective date of USPAP. Those real estate appraisers issued a license more than 6 months after the effective date of USPAP shall complete the 7-hour National USPAP Update Course within 6 months after licensure. This has been Illinois law since January 20, 2011 which means that it was meant to begin with the 2012-2013 release of USPAP. I get a lot of appraisers who say the following: “But,...

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What is the FDIC Suing Appraisers About? Some Examples of the FDIC’s Specific Allegations?

The FDIC continues to sue residential appraisers in connection with origination appraisals and review appraisals performed for failed lenders between 2003-2009 on loans now in default. It may be helpful, or scary, for appraisers and AMCs to see for themselves exactly what kinds of alleged USPAP violations or other errors the FDIC is claiming in lawsuits against appraisers. Therefore, I have copied below the FDIC’s actual allegations against several appraisers. These are word-for-word the entirety of the FDIC’s claimed errors against these appraiser defendants. Please don’t shoot the messenger. I’m a lawyer, not a USPAP expert, but even I know...

Seasoned Professionals Wake up call 3

Wake Up Call for Seasoned Professionals

Rookie mistakes by seasoned professionals are inexcusable. Here’s a disturbing trend that the board is seeing more frequently: Appraisers who do not know how real estate works. What do I mean by that? There are complaints pouring in where the appraiser doesn’t know how to read contracts, riders, leases, zoning restrictions, blue prints, or listings. I’m not talking about complex documents or Associate Trainees struggling with their first few assignments. I’m referring to seasoned professionals who’ve been in the business for five, ten, or even thirty years. We have complaints where appraisers can’t tell when they’ve been presented with a...

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Residential Appraising in a Declining Market

APB Valuation Advisory #3: Residential Appraising in a Declining Market The Appraisal Foundation is pleased to announce that the Appraisal Practices Board (APB) has adopted “APB Valuation Advisory #3: Residential Appraising in a Declining Market.” The APB is an independent Board of The Appraisal Foundation, which is responsible for developing voluntary guidance on recognized valuation methods and techniques. APB Valuation Advisory #3: Residential Appraising in a Declining Market, includes guidance on: How Should an Appraiser Define a Declining Market? What Databases are Available to Support a Market Trend Conclusion? What are Some Alternative Value Definitions? Defining a Market vs. a...

Question your appraisal fees 5

How Much Do You Charge for a 1004?

Question: “Care to reveal the minimum fee for a ‘typical’ 1004 + MC in your area?” Had an interesting email come in yesterday. It came from a friend of mine in the appraisal industry and began with this question, “Care to reveal the minimum fee for a ‘typical’ 1004 + MC in your area?” The message went on to express some concern over some of the shenanigans that was going on in his own area concerning AMCs, low fees, and appraiser’s willingness to sell themselves short. Unfortunately, the same is likely going on in every community (yours included). Though the...

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Sense is like courtesy it is no longer common!

I dealt with an old question recently that I felt was pertinent and worthy of repeating. The question arose in Brooklyn, NY when an underwriter demanded that the appraiser include the basement area as part of the gross building area when comparing the subject to the comparable sales. After all they reasoned, Fannie Mae guidelines, i.e. Property and Appraisal Guidelines, XI 405.07 state, “Gross building area, which is the total finished area (including any interior common areas, such as stairways and hallways) of the improvements based on exterior measurements, is the most common comparison for two-to four-family properties. The gross...

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Cert 22 With a Twist

I’ve written about this before but it’s well worth repeating. Please keep in mind, this is and has been the position of the Illinois board. If you appraise a property for Client A, and two years later, Client B wants you defend your report, you’re not required to answer their queries about the report created for Client A. What if Client B threatens to blacklist you for not cooperating in the review? When does the client relationship end with Client A? USPAP states: An appraiser must protect the confidential nature of the appraiser-client relationship. That seems clear enough. So, who...

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