Monthly Archive: October 2011

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Exposure Draft: Adjusting Comparable Sales for Seller Concessions

The best way for valuation professionals and the public to make a difference in their profession is to offer comments to the Boards of The Appraisal Foundation when exposure drafts are released for comment. The Appraisal Practices Board (APB) has recently released its first Exposure Draft entitled Adjusting Comparable Sales for Seller Concessions. All interested parties are encouraged to comment in writing to the APB before the comment deadline of December 2, 2011. Written comments on this Exposure Draft can be submitted by mail, email and facsimile: Mail: Appraisal Practices Board The Appraisal Foundation 1155 15th Street NW, Suite 1111...

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CHASEing USPAP

Chase has turned a lot of appraisers into state appraisal boards. They’ve been responsible for nearly 20% of the Illinois caseload since 2008. The volume ebbs and flows from one quarter to the next. Not all of their complaints are good. Then again, not all of them are bad, either. All of their complaints insist that the original appraisal was too high. In their complaint submissions to us, they generally include a letter to the original appraiser that predates the complaint by months. In Chase’s complaints to us they typically include an appraisal review of some type. The standard review is a form 2000 as completed by an Illinois appraiser. Sometimes those reviews...

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Unintended Consequences – Intended Use

Intended use must be clearly stated in the report. Unintended Consequences From USPAP: INTENDED USE: the use or uses of an appraiser’s reported appraisal, appraisal review, or appraisal consulting assignment opinions and conclusions, as identified by the appraiser based on communication with the client at the time of the assignment. There can be many intended uses for one appraisal. We all understand that. An appraiser can, theoretically, complete an appraisal on an REO to find a reasonable marketing price and that same report can, theoretically, be used for mortgage purposes. Great! Two birds; one stone. But, if you utilize the Fannie Mae 1004 you have only one intended use. From the 1004: INTENDED USE: The intended use of this appraisal report is for the lender/client to evaluate the property that is the subject of this appraisal for a mortgage...

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